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A Few Purchase Tips
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  A Few Purchase Tips



A few tips before you purchase ski goggles:

First and foremost, if you have prescription glasses, then be sure you buy specially designed goggles made to your prescription, or buy regular goggles that are built to fit over your glasses. If you use contacts, then this shouldn't be a problem at all.

Second - don't be tempted to buy the first pair you try on without attempting to fit it properly, because ill-fitting goggles can cause great discomfort and they won't function well in insulating you from the weather. Try on as many as you can and ask the store-clerk what kind of goggles they are. Ask to take them outside if you can and see if they block the reflections of direct sunlight.

If you can see the glare, then the goggles aren't right for use in the day and they probably don't provide enough ultra-violet protection. Try a specialty optical store or outdoor store, or ski/board store. It will probably cost you less money than buying in a specialty store near the mountain, where prices are unnecessarily high. This will also give you more time to consider better options.

Thirdly you must ask what kind of goggle you should be looking for. This is especially true of the color of the lens. Night skiing requires clear goggles, or only slightly tinted glasses of rose or yellow hue. Low or moderate light and fog require gold or amber tinted lenses that filter out blue light. They will emphasis the minute differences in shades that just visible on snowy slope in poor lighting. Rose lenses are excellent on low-light gray days. Bright daylight, on the other hand, requires goggles more heavily tinted and green is a good shade for these conditions. You can see through green tints very comfortably for long periods of time and they don't create too much stress for the eyes. Weather, terrain, temperature and activity type should all be stated to the clerk before you purchase so a suitable one can be selected for you.

Fourth , there is the question of additional functions, such as specific coatings that either blocks glare or what's called ‘mirror flashes'. You should also remember the importance of polarized lenses which block horizontal light reflections that are typical to end-of-the-day light. When the sun sinks below the hills, the glare off the snow can be blinding and some polarized lenses come in darker tints suitable to this type of light.

 


 
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